Why healthy wetlands are important for a healthy reef

This is a guest post written by Chelsea Broad. Chelsea attended the World Wetlands Day event put on by NQ Dry Tropics on Thursday 2nd Feb 2017. The views expressed in this post are the authors and not necessarily those of NQCC.

 

Photo credit: Chelsea Broad

World Wetlands Day works to educate the community on the issues facing the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and inspire the community to take action to protect the GBR and associated wetlands. More than 50 community members participated in educational lectures from the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority and the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) and tours of ReefHQ and AIMS, including the world class scientific laboratory, SeaSim, within the Townsville region.

 

Did you know that keeping inland wetlands healthy is crucial for protecting the GBR? This is because corals need sediment-free water to be healthy. Inland wetlands filter sediments out of the waterways prior to arriving to the ocean, providing the corals with sediment free water. Without healthy wetlands, the GBR is at risk of increased sediment exposure. The radiant reef ecosystem pictured here is located at AIMS to educate guests on what a healthy outer reef looks like.  Continue reading “Why healthy wetlands are important for a healthy reef”

Upcoming opportunities with NQCC

NQCC love to get our members and supporters involved in our activities.

We have several great opportunities for volunteering and training, plus we have a vacancy to join our small team.

Email us at coordinator@nqcc.org.au if any of the below opportunities interest you.

Adani Roadshow 25th January

6 volunteers

Adani’s job-spruiking roadshow is coming to Townsville, and we’d like you to be part of the audience to challenge their dodgy jobs claims. More information here. Must be available between 10am-2pm. Send us an email with your contact details to express your interest and find out more.

Meet your MP training with Australian Conservation Foundation 25th January 5:45-7:30pm

We once again welcome ACF to our office for some training about meeting with your local elected politician. Dinner provided. You’ll need to RSVP here.

Community Campaigner – 10 hours a week (paid, flexible hours)

We are seeking expressions of interest from our network for the role of Community Campaigner. Key areas of responsibility in this role include: community engagement and education, fundraising, event management and working alongside the Coordinator to develop and implement campaigns. A full position description is available here. Please email through your resume and a cover letter about what assets you would bring to NQCC. Continue reading “Upcoming opportunities with NQCC”

Adani Carmichael Coal Mine: Addressing the Facts

This is a post by outgoing Community Campaigner Jacob Miller.

The Adani Carmichael Project has increasingly benefited from State and Federal Government support while the list of financial institutions distancing themselves the project continues to grow. Supporters of the mine try to justify the project, citing the supposed economic benefits for North Queensland and even go so far as to claim coal from the mine will help India reduce its carbon emissions. This post is going examine and dispel the myths that are being used to prop up the case for the Carmichael project.

The Adani Carmichael Mine as ‘Critical Infrastructure’

The Queensland Government declared the Adani Carmichael project ‘critical infrastructure’ in October; reducing the amount of red tape for the project and allowing the Coordinator General to sign off on approvals quickly. The apparent justification for labelling the project critical infrastructure Continue reading “Adani Carmichael Coal Mine: Addressing the Facts”

Water security – update and references

Ross Dam
The upper reaches of Ross Dam in November 2014

Between them, the very low level of Ross Dam, TCC’s water restrictions (currently Level 3) and the continuing lack of rain have focused unprecedented attention on Townsville’s water security. At this stage it seems that most people realise there is no single solution – that we will have to approach the problem on several fronts to fix it – but there is little agreement on priorities.

NQCC

NQCC has published four blog posts under the heading NQCC Water Security Series: Continue reading “Water security – update and references”

A Case For a Floating Solar Farm in Townsville’s Ross River Dam

A study on the viability of a Floating Solar Farm on the Ross Dam
A Floating Solar Farm In Japan – Photo by Charles Goodell

This is a guest post by Elly Hanrahan, an intern for the North Queensland Conservation Council. All views expressed are representative of Elly and not necessarily of the NQCC.

Townsville is currently experiencing its driest 11-month period since records began in 1841. With no action on water security from any level of government, desperate residents have formed the newly created Facebook group called ‘Water For Townsville Action Group’ in order to come up with a plan to secure Townsville’s water supply into the future.

At the moment, Townsville City Council is pumping 130 mega litres (ML) of water a day from the Burdekin and at a cost of roughly $27,000 per day. Even whilst pumping at full capacity, the dam level continues to drop with Townsville residents using roughly 1,700L per day- more than eight times the average usage of Brisbane residents. Evaporation also plays a large part in the shortage; given the extraordinary size of the shallow dam, Councillor Paul Jacob confirmed to the Townsville Bulletin that we lose between ‘20 and 40 mega litres per day due to evaporation alone’.

It is obvious that prolonged pumping is not a sustainable solution as it is both expensive and inefficient. Many solutions have been proposed such as duplicating the Haughton pipeline from the Burdekin, desalination systems, recycling plants and the proposed construction of the Hell’s Gate dam. One of the more creative solutions put forward on the Water Action Facebook group was a floating solar panel array on the Ross River Dam itself.

Continue reading “A Case For a Floating Solar Farm in Townsville’s Ross River Dam”