Empowering NQ women for the Environment

This post is written by Liz Murphy-Forrester from Queensland Conservation Council. It orginally appears on their website. Queensland Conservation Council and North Queensland Conservation Council collaborated together to put on an event for Queensland Women’s Week.

In a culture where we are often focused on limitations, ‘Empowering NQ women for the Environment’ on Magnetic Island was an event that celebrated the incredible capacity of generations of NQ women standing up boldly for the environment.

The whole group

The weekend retreat, held during Queensland Women’s Week, saw women from Mackay through to Cairns come together to share stories, skills and strengthen networks. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women shared stories, through dance, about their life journeys and caring for country.

Continue reading “Empowering NQ women for the Environment”

Paperbark March 2017 – Let’s #StopAdani!

Welcome to the March edition of Paperbark. This month we are ramping up our #StopAdani campaign – read on to find out how you can be involved. We also have some great training opportunities coming up this month. Continue reading “Paperbark March 2017 – Let’s #StopAdani!”

In the News: Comments on Flying Fox Management

LGAQ calls on governments to take control of flying fox issue

This article was written by ABC NQs Nathalie Fernbach, and originally published here.

The peak body representing local government in Queensland is calling for state and federal governments to take control of flying fox management.

The Local Government Association Queensland’s (LGAQ) call follows the release of the results of the federal parliamentary inquiry into management of flying foxes in the eastern states of Australia.

The Standing Committee on Environment and Energy’s Living With Fruit Bats report recommended the establishment of a co-operative body to co-ordinate national management and to identify policy and research priorities. Continue reading “In the News: Comments on Flying Fox Management”

Protecting Cassowaries from Predatory Domestic Animals

Ingrid Marker has lived adjacent to the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area near Mission Beach for 25 years. In that time, a family of seven cassowaries became frequent visitors and made themselves at home on her property. Ingrid was lucky to witness the family have chicks and grow into mature birds with their own chicks, as they strutted around her home and garden over the years. Cassowaries are listed as endangered, and there are less than 1,400 in existence.

Two years ago, the unthinkable happened. Roaming domestic dogs tore through her home and over four months killed the family of cassowaries and all their chicks. After killing the cassowaries, the domestic dogs returned, broke through the fly-wire and tried to attack Ingrid within her own home. Two out of the pack of six dogs were caught in the National Park trap, but as they were collared they were returned by Council, without penalty to their owners. The other uncollared dogs were never caught. They all belonged to locals and were all allowed to roam at night becoming serial killers.

Continue reading “Protecting Cassowaries from Predatory Domestic Animals”

MEDIA RELEASE: Bright, sunny future for NQ renewables

“While Adani’s Carmichael coal mine is beset with opposition and financing problems, the contrast to the go-ahead of yet another renewable, solar power station couldn’t be clearer” said NQ Conservation’s Maree Dibella, after news of the commencement of the $126 million Kidston Solar Project was announced by the Queensland Government yesterday.

“These are just the sorts of projects that conservationists support. It’s really exciting – an unused mine site being transformed into a renewable energy production and storage powerhouse” said Ms Dibella.

“Large scale, innovative renewable energy projects are what we envision for the future of North Queensland. A later part of the project will add hydro to store the solar power generated during the day. This is the first in the world to use two disused mine pits for hydroelectric power generation.

“The project will be able to generate up to 330 MW of rapid response, flexible power to the grid – demonstrating that renewables can deliver energy security.

“Renewable energy projects in North Queensland are shovel-ready and are attracting investor confidence with stable policy to achieve a 50% renewable energy target by 2030. Meanwhile, Adani is struggling to find investor support with over a dozen international financial institutions declaring they won’t back it.

“It’s clear that renewable energy is where our region is heading” said Ms Dibella.

More info about the Kidston Solar Project available here.